Mark - Canada - Classical/Jazz pianist and recreational bodybuilder. Aspiring musicologist.

Also, bunnies.

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Strongblr with 4,109 notes

simplefitlife:

Pretty Much.

simplefitlife:

Pretty Much.

Source: simplefitlife

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Journey of a Male Fitness Model with 748 notes

Source: average-to-beast

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Dominate Humbly with 3,759 notes

Source: dd7176b2

16th April 2014

Quote reblogged from All Hail Galvatron with 15 notes

I didnt want to go to the gym.

but I went to the gym.

— a story by me (via swolizard)

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from The Exercist with 269 notes

the-exercist:

"Honestly, what is that extra hour rolling in your bed going to achieve compared to a solid workout?"
Let’s take a minute to talk about what sleep achieves:
Improved short-term and long-term memory
Lowered risk of infection
Lowered risk of heart disease
Lowered risk of diabetes
Increased life span
Decreased inflammation
Increased levels of creativity
Longer attention span and increased attentiveness
Increased efficiency of vaccinations
Regulation of hormones
Increased ability to balance a healthy bodyweight
Lowered stress levels
Decreased likelihood of depression or mood disorders
Giving up sleep in order to exercise is not an inherently good decision. You need that time to rest your body and recover from the day before. If you aren’t getting enough sleep, then increasing your activity is going to be incredibly dangerous. It can negatively impact both your mental wellbeing and your physical health. So giving up sleep in order to garner the benefits of exercise? That can be like shooting yourself in the foot.
Of course, there are a lot of cases where getting up a little early for exercise is going to be a good thing. This works well for some people. But there are just as many cases where getting up early would hurt someone. That extra hour might be completely necessary for their health. 
So don’t feel bullied into starting an early exercise schedule or cutting your sleep short so that you can get to the gym. The average person needs a solid 7-8 hours every night. Not 7-8 hours of tossing and turning, not lying in bed for 7-8 hours - Actually sleeping that long. If you’re consistently tired and don’t feel rested, then exercise will not inherently help you. Make sure you’re consciously evaluating your routine and know if getting up even earlier would bring some benefits. 
Resources: 
Huffington Post
NIH
Harvard.edu
WedMD
MUSCHealth

the-exercist:

"Honestly, what is that extra hour rolling in your bed going to achieve compared to a solid workout?"

Let’s take a minute to talk about what sleep achieves:

  • Improved short-term and long-term memory
  • Lowered risk of infection
  • Lowered risk of heart disease
  • Lowered risk of diabetes
  • Increased life span
  • Decreased inflammation
  • Increased levels of creativity
  • Longer attention span and increased attentiveness
  • Increased efficiency of vaccinations
  • Regulation of hormones
  • Increased ability to balance a healthy bodyweight
  • Lowered stress levels
  • Decreased likelihood of depression or mood disorders

Giving up sleep in order to exercise is not an inherently good decision. You need that time to rest your body and recover from the day before. If you aren’t getting enough sleep, then increasing your activity is going to be incredibly dangerous. It can negatively impact both your mental wellbeing and your physical health. So giving up sleep in order to garner the benefits of exercise? That can be like shooting yourself in the foot.

Of course, there are a lot of cases where getting up a little early for exercise is going to be a good thing. This works well for some people. But there are just as many cases where getting up early would hurt someone. That extra hour might be completely necessary for their health. 

So don’t feel bullied into starting an early exercise schedule or cutting your sleep short so that you can get to the gym. The average person needs a solid 7-8 hours every night. Not 7-8 hours of tossing and turning, not lying in bed for 7-8 hours - Actually sleeping that long. If you’re consistently tired and don’t feel rested, then exercise will not inherently help you. Make sure you’re consciously evaluating your routine and know if getting up even earlier would bring some benefits. 

Resources: 

Source: fit-and-hip

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Laugh-Addict! with 12,832 notes

laugh-addict:

 

double third scales done right

laugh-addict:

 

double third scales done right

Source: vine.co

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Life of a Lifter with 85 notes

Source: big-strong-tough

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from I'm On My Way with 1,086 notes

Augmented Sixth Chords

shadowed112:

Why can’t they just all come pre-labeled like this?

image

(accidentals carry through)

Source: shadowed112

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from I came, I saw, I conquered. with 1,491 notes

Source: crossfitchicks

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from Opus 72 with 1,265 notes

Fortissimo Trombone Entries

trumpetangst:

image

Source: trumpetangst